Archive for the ‘Dog Training’ Category

Dog Behavior: “Your Dog is Your Mirror,” by Kevin Behan — on the “My Doggie Says…” Show

Tuesday, December 20th, 2011
Kevin Behan is a long-time dog behavior expert.  On the "My Doggie Says..." show, he talked about his noe book: "Your Dog is Your Mirror."

Kevin Behan on the "My Doggie Says..." Show:   Kevin Behan, dog behavior expert,  grew up on his parent’s farm in rural Connecticut immersed in a landscape of natural beauty and surrounded by dogs. Kevin’s father, John Behan, founded Canine College, trained dogs in the Canine Corps in WWII and was the first in America to train protection dogs for hospitals, police units, and even retail stores such as Macy’s. Kevin worked in his father’s kennel where he encountered every possible type of dog exhibiting every type of behavior. Consequently, Kevin grew up without judgment about dog behavior, even aggression, as everything dogs did was taken as a matter of course. Kevin trained his first dog, a poodle named Onyx, at age ten. As Kevin matured, so did his ideas about his experiences and the behaviors he witnessed. By carefully watching the workings of nature, Kevin began to see that what made the modern dog adaptable and trainable was not the dominance hierarchy, as taught to him by his father, but the dog’s ability to work as a cooperative group member in the hunt. Influenced by European police dog trainers and a German shepherding sage named Mannel, Kevin’s theories and techniques came together in the 1980′s as Natural Dog Training. Kevin then started his own kennel, Canine Arts, in Brookfield, Connecticut and published his first book, Natural Dog Training in 1992. Using techniques totally unique, Kevin has trained hundreds of police, protection, and border control dogs, as well as thousands of America’s pets. He has become the nation’s foremost expert on the rehabilitation of aggressive and problem dogs, which is now where he concentrates most of his work. A seasoned lecturer and seminar host, Kevin’s presentations go well beyond the training of dogs and into the very core of canine behavior. He has pioneered the Natural Dog Training movement with his articles and theories on energy, the linkage between dogs and emotion, prey vs. predator model, as well as instrumental training techniques like pushing and eye contact. Kevin now lives with his family on their 60-acre farm in beautiful Southern Vermont. His second book, Your Dog is Your Mirror: The Emotional Capacity of Our Dogs and Ourselves is now available in bookstores and online. He also actively participates in readers’ comments and conversations on the NDT site. Follow the Discussions here. Learn more about Kevin's work by clicking here.

Pat Miller, of Peaceable Paws, on the “My Doggie Says…” Show

Tuesday, November 22nd, 2011

A "cross-over" trainer, Pat started her long dog-training career using "old-fashioned" methods that relied on the use of force-based tools and methods – jerks on the choke chain, harsh verbal corrections – and successfully earned numerous obedience titles with a variety of dogs, including a Rough Collie, a Bull Terrier, an Australian Kelpie, a Pomeranian, and Josie, her wonderful Terrier mix. It was Josie who convinced her to cross over to force-free methods, and she is now fully committed to science-based, positive reinforcement training. Hear Pat talk about "positive reinforcement training," on the "My Doggie Says..." show.  

“Will My Dog Hate Me?” Edie Jarolim on the “My Doggie Says…” Show

Thursday, October 20th, 2011
Edie Jarolim in her own words from her "willmydoghateme" blog: Writing about dogs is easy. Writing about myself…not so much. But in brief: I’m Edie Jarolim, writer, editor, and dog slave. I have a website where you can learn more about those first two aspects of my life. And if you like this blog, which involves a great deal of writing and editing, I hope you’ll go there, check my credentials, and give me work. But before I send you away, here’s a bit more background. I earned a Ph.D. in English literature from New York University; edited guidebooks at Frommer’s, Rough Guides, and Fodor’s; published myriad travel articles and three travel guides; and led a reasonably respectable but dogless life until 2004, when I adopted Frankie, my first and still only dog. Having gotten Frankie relatively late in life (both mine and his), I was a bit insecure about my canine caretaking abilities. To put it mildly. I began reading obsessively about dogs and badgering every dog owner willing to answer my questions to tell me what they knew. As a result, I ended up contributing dog stories to such publications as The Bark and Ladies Home Journal and, eventually, authoring AM I BORING MY DOG? And 99 Other Things Every Dog Wishes You Knew (Alpha/Penguin, 2009). Now I am a regular contributor to Your Dog, the newsletter for Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University. And I write this blog. I am also the Contributing Dining Editor for Tucson Guide magazine and the Tucson correspondent for Zagat.com. But while dogs and dining are my passions, I still do a good deal of dog-free and food-free writing and editing. Ok, so now it’s time for you to go check out my website, www.ediejarolim.com. Here's Edie on the "My Doggie Says..." show:  

Pat Miller, of PeaceablePaws.com, this Wednesday on the “My Doggie Says…” Radio Show

Tuesday, August 23rd, 2011
Listen to Pat Miller talk about her approach to dog training and achieving harmony between "human and non-human" animals.  Pat is the founder of PeaceablePaws.com, a a web site devoted to harmony and bonding between people and their pets. The "My Doggie Says..." show is broadcast live on KFNX-1100 in Phoenix, every Wednesday evening from 8:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. Mountain Standard Time.  Live streaming can be found at www.1100kfnx.com. Every week, Fred interviews an expert in dog training or animal behavior, or some other important aspect of building a special bond with your dog.   To call the show: (602) 277-KFNX, or (866) 536-1100.  Call-in and get a free copy of the "Dog Appreciation Lessons" CD!

Man’s Best Friend Likes Boats, Too — A Dog Training Challenge

Tuesday, August 9th, 2011
I'm spending a few days at Lake Arrowhead, which is a great getaway for my family -- and for Callie Golden Retriever.  Callie loves to swim here, and she loves going for boat rides and fishing from our boat.  It took a little dog training to get her to swim for her floating Frisbee without getting into the boat traffic, but she's learned well.  It also took a little dog training to get her to stay away from the edges of the boat -- I've been a little nervous that she might jump off, because she loves to swim so much. It's fun, at Lake Arrowhead, to see how many dogs enjoy boating, as well as swimming in the lake.  You see dogs balanced on canoes and kayaks.  And it's not unusual to see a boat speeding along at twenty-five miles an hour with a dog sitting proudly -- all by himself -- in the bow. This morning on my walk with Callie, I watched a couple -- and their Yellow Labrador Retriever -- launch their kayak.  The Lab hasn't quite figured out how to jump into the kayak, but with a little more dog training, he will.  So his dad had to lift him in, but then he settled into the caboose seat and looked like he was very happy there.  It reminded me a lot of training Callie to "jump up" into our SUV.  It's my current dog training challenge., but we're getting there. So it seems that dogs make great boaters, too.  Doesn't this look like fun? With a little training, dogs make great boaters

Dog Training and Dog Behavior — Tonight on the “My Doggie Says…” Show — with guest Cindy Scott, Director of Dogs Etc.

Wednesday, August 3rd, 2011
Cindy Scott is a Trainer and Behavioral Consultant who has professionally trained dogs and their owners since 1993. She is the Director of Dogs Etc. where she consults with owners and their pets during private in-home sessions as well as group classes. She received a Bachelor of Arts Degree from California State University at Fullerton and she continues to work with Behaviorists and Veterinarians form around the world to stay up-to-date on the latest training techniques and learning theories. Cindy is committed to giving back to the community and assisting as many animals as possible. That is why a portion of all proceeds from training and from the sale of training equipment are donated to the ASOCA and the American Humane Society. The "My Doggie Says..." show is broadcast live on KFNX-1100 in Phoenix, every Wednesday evening from 8:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. Mountain Standard Time.  Live streaming can be found at www.1100kfnx.com.  Every week, Fred interviews an expert in dog training or animal behavior, or some other important aspect of building a special bond with your dog.   To call the show: (602) 277-KFNX, or (866) 536-1100.  Callers welcome!

On the “My Doggie Says…” Show: Dr. Shawn Messonier, of “Pet Care Naturally”

Tuesday, July 26th, 2011
Our guest tomorrow night will be Dr. Shawn Messonier. Dr. Shawn Messonnier, DVM Dr. Messonnier, a 1987 graduate of Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine, opened Paws & Claws Animal Hospital in 1991. His special interests include exotic pets, dermatology, cancer, and internal medicine. Dr. Messonnier is a well-known speaker and author. In addition to serving clients, he has written for numerous veterinary and pet publications including Animal Wellness, Body + Soul, Veterinary Forum, Dog Fancy, Cat Fancy, Dog World, Fido Friendly, Whole Dog Journal, Whole Cat Journal, Whole Living, Total Health and Wellness. He is the author of several books, including The Natural Health Bible for Dogs & Cats, The Allergy Solution for Dogs, The Arthritis Solution for Dogs & Cats, The Natural Vet's Guide to Preventing and Treating Cancer in Dogs, 8 Weeks to a Healthy Dog and Unexpected Miracles: Hope and Holistic Healing for Pets. Dr. Shawn has served as a consultant, done research for, or lectured for many highly respected companies in the pet care industry, including Pet Togethers, Ark Naturals, N-Bones, Nature’s Variety, Heel, Nutramax, and RX Vitamins for Pets. Dr. Shawn is a member of several health care organizations, including the Oncology (Cancer) Association of Naturopathic Physicians, American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association, American Veterinary Medical Association, and Texas Veterinary Medical Association. He is also the host of the weekly award-winning radio show, "Dr. Shawn-The Natural Vet", on Martha Stewart Radio SIRIUS channel 112 on Tuesdays from 8:00 PM to 9:00 PM (EST) with a repeat on Sunday from 7:00 PM to 8:00 PM (EST). ...and NOW on XM channel 103, live every Tuesday night from 8:00 PM to 9:00 PM (EST)! The "My Doggie Says..." show is broadcast live on KFNX-1100 in Phoenix, every Wednesday evening from 8:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. Mountain Standard Time.  Live streaming can be found at www.1100kfnx.com.  Every week, Fred interviews an expert in dog training or animal behavior, or some other important aspect of building a special bond with your dog.   To call the show: (602) 277-KFNX, or (866) 536-1100.  Callers welcome!

Learn Secrets of Dog Training on the “My Doggie Says…” Radio Show, Wednesday, July 20, 2011

Tuesday, July 19th, 2011
Our guest on the "My Doggie Says..." radio show, this Wednesday,  will be Rachel Baum, of Bark Busters.  Rachel is also the author of "Confessions of a Dog Trainer." RACHEL BAUM, CPDT-KA, is a graduate of both the Bark Busters Home Dog Training program and has achieved the level of Master Trainer and Dog Behavioral Therapist. She is a a certified professional dog trainer, and is a professional member of the Association of Pet Dog Trainers, and the International Association of Canine Professionals, as well as an AKC Canine Good Citizen Evaluator. Rachel has trained over 1,000 dogs, and is recommended by local veterinarians and rescue groups including Forever Home Greyhounds and the Capital District Humane Association. Using dog-friendly techniques, Rachel is committed to helping all dog owners establish a relationship with their dogs based on love, leadership and trust. She specializes in assisting owners find solutions to potentially embarrassing problems like jumping up on people, nuisance barking, pulling on the leash, and destructive behavior like chewing and digging. The "My Doggie Says..." show is broadcast live on KFNX-1100 in Phoenix, every Wednesday evening from 8:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. Mountain Standard Time.  Live streaming can be found at www.1100kfnx.com.  Every week, Fred interviews an expert in dog training or animal behavior, or some other important aspect of building a special bond with your dog.   To call the show: (602) 277-KFNX, or (866) 536-1100.  Callers welcome! Hear Rachel's ideas on dog training here:  

Train Your Dog To Be A Social Animal

Sunday, July 17th, 2011
Here's another example of Callie being a "social" dog -- at Lake Arrowhead Village.  Like Jamie, Callie loves the Wishing Well gift shop, because they have the BEST puppy treats.  Notice the "wishing well" in the background of this photo.
Callie Enjoys Socializing at Lake Arrowhead Village

Train Your Dog To Be Social

Dogs are very social animals -- if allowed to be. Sometimes the difficult part of "training" your dog to be social is for you to lose your fear that something bad will happen if your dog interacts with other dogs or people. Bad things can happen, of course, so you have to know your dog's temperament -- and be ready to protect it, if necessary. But too often, the owner's fear gets in the way of a good socializing experience. If your dog feels you pulling on its leash when people, or dogs, approach, it might get the idea that it needs to be protective, or defensive. So, to train your dog to be social, train yourself to trust your dog in social situations. Most of the time, dogs are happy to see each other, and they get along just fine. Be ready to act, if necessary, but don't turn your dog into a wallflower by holding it back from social situations. In these situations, like lots of others, communication with your dog can be important.  When dogs or people approach, "read" your dog's reaction.  Is it happy?  Apprehensive?  Afraid?  Eager to make friends?  As you get better at understanding your dog, you will be better able to help it in social situations. It also helps to understand your dog's "social personality."  For example, Callie often approaches other dogs in a very submissive manner -- making it clear that she wants to be friendly and not aggressive.  She often lies down -- or even flops over on her back -- in a very submissive way.  She makes lots of doggie friends this way. As is often the case, dog training is more about people training than anything else.