Archive for the ‘Training’ Category

Liam Crowe, CEO of Barkbusters USA, on the "My Doggie Says…" Radio Show

Friday, February 20th, 2009
Liam Crowe, CEO of Barkbusters USA, talks about his organization and how it has helped to train over 500,000 dogs worldwide. Barkbusters' franchise approach to dog training has spread to 11 countries, and they have a lot of wonderful "dog whispering" successes.   The "My Doggie Says..." show helps listeners gain a deeper appreciation for "Man's Best Friend." The show is broadcast live from 8:00 to 9:00 p.m. on Wednesday nights, on KFNX 1100, Phoenix. It is streamed live on www.1100kfnx.com. Host Fred Haney interviews experts on all aspects of dogs and dog ownership. Listen to past interviews at www.mydoggiesays.com/. The show is also available as a podcast on iTunes. Go to the iTunes store, click on "Podcast," and search for "My Doggie Says..."

Sean Senechal, Author of "AnimalSign TO You," on the "My Doggie Says…" Radio Show

Friday, January 30th, 2009
Sean Senechal, author of "AnimalSign TO You," describes how she teaches animals to speak to humans using sign language. You can learn more by visiting her web site at www.animalsign.org/.   The "My Doggie Says..." show helps listeners gain a deeper appreciation for "Man's Best Friend." The show is broadcast live from 8:00 to 9:00 p.m. on Wednesday nights, on KFNX 1100, Phoenix. It is streamed live on www.1100kfnx.com. Host Fred Haney interviews experts on all aspects of dogs and dog ownership. Listen to past interviews at www.mydoggiesays.com/. The show is also available as a podcast on iTunes. Go to the iTunes store, click on "Podcast," and search for "My Doggie Says..."

Help Your Dog Fulfill Its Social Aspirations

Tuesday, January 20th, 2009
Most dogs are social animals, so why not help your dog fulfill its social aspirations? Your dog will make more friends -- with people and with other dogs -- and it will gain confidence. What better way to endear yourself to your dog than to help it make friends? Which is something it desperately wants to do. Here's an article from WikiHow that has some suggestions on how to help your dog socialize. And here's one from about.com. Callie's very social -- both with people and with other dogs. On our morning jog, we often take shortcuts through the local golf course. So Callie has become best of friends with Jeff, the assistant greens keeper. Jeff occasionally gives Callie a newly found tennis ball, which, in Callie's world, is every bit as good as a puppy treat -- maybe better. When we're anywhere near the golf course, Callie is obviously looking for Jeff. If there's a golf cart within 100 yards, Callie focuses on it; she gets excited if she thinks it might be Jeff. Yesterday, Callie did see Jeff in his cart, but he drove away to do some greens keeping business. It was obvious that Callie was very disappointed. She pulled on the leash to chase after Jeff, ears back expressing her frustration. Callie also likes to make doggie friends. She has about a dozen regulars, but she's always up for meeting new dogs. Here's Callie with one of her favorite regulars, Bub McLoughlin, the Goldendoodle cadaver dog. Callie sees Bub every few weeks at Lake Arrowhead village, and every reunion between the two good friends is playful and sporting. It's kind of obvious that, if dogs are so social, it makes sense to let them socialize. But I think a lot of owners mess this up. They're afraid their precious pet might get hurt. So they don't let it socialize. Or they keep the leash so tight that the dog thinks the owner is afraid of the other dog -- so the owner's dog gets defensive and protective. The best policy in these situations (outside a dog park and assuming leash laws apply) is to give both dogs lots of loose leash and let them "work it out." Chances are the other dog is a social addict, too, so they'll probably enjoy getting to know each other. You may have to work with the other owner to keep the leashes from getting tangled. But the dogs will have fun. On the odd chance that things do get out of hand, just pull your dog away and go find a more friendly companion. Nurturing your dog's personality is one of the best ways to build a stronger relationship with it. Almost all dogs have a strong desire to interact with dogs and people. Stanley Coren has an interesting way of saying this. He says that dogs have the intelligence of a 2 1/2 year old child. But he also says they have the social instincts of a teenager. So help your dog be a teenager!

Janene Zakrajsek, of the Pussy & Pooch Penthouse and Pawbar, on the "My Doggie Says…" Radio Show

Monday, January 12th, 2009
Janene Zakrajsek is a co-founder of Pussy & Pooch Penthouse and Pawbar, a unique gathering place for dogs and their people -- in the middle of downtown Los Angeles. Janene takes the listener on a tour of this unusual shop and she discusses the shop's different dog and human "social programs."   The "My Doggie Says..." show helps listeners gain a deeper appreciation for "Man's Best Friend." The show is broadcast live from 8:00 to 9:00 p.m. on Wednesday nights, on KFNX 1100, Phoenix. It is streamed live on www.1100kfnx.com. Host Fred Haney interviews experts on all aspects of dogs and dog ownership. The show is also available as a podcast on iTunes. Go to the iTunes store, click on "Podcast," and search for "My Doggie Says..."

Karen Klingberg, of the National Disaster Search Dog Foundation, on the "My Doggie Says…" Show

Sunday, November 23rd, 2008
Karen Klingberg, of the National Disaster Search Dog Foundation, make a guest appearance on the "My Doggie Says..." Show and describes how the Foundation finds and trains dogs to assist in critical searches.   The "My Doggie Says..." show helps listeners gain a deeper appreciation for "Man's Best Friend." The show is broadcast live from 8:00 to 9:00 p.m. on Wednesday nights, on KFNX 1100, Phoenix. It is streamed live on www.1100kfnx.com. Host Fred Haney interviews experts on all aspects of dogs and dog ownership. The show is also available as a podcast on iTunes. Go to the iTunes store, click on "Podcast," and search for "My Doggie Says..."

Dave Reaver, of Adlerhorst International, Talks About K-9 Training on the "My Doggie Says…" Show

Sunday, November 23rd, 2008
Dave Reaver, of Adlerhorst International, has been a dog trainer for over 35 years. He sources K-9s for police and fire departments and for customs officials. He has been an expert witness in many lawsuits, and he is responsible for the ruling that a properly trained K-9 animal is not a "deadly weapon."   The "My Doggie Says..." show helps listeners gain a deeper appreciation for "Man's Best Friend." The show is broadcast live from 8:00 to 9:00 p.m. on Wednesday nights, on KFNX 1100, Phoenix. It is streamed live on www.1100kfnx.com. Host Fred Haney interviews experts on all aspects of dogs and dog ownership. The show is also available as a podcast on iTunes. Go to the iTunes store, click on "Podcast," and search for "My Doggie Says..."

This Dog Finds Money — Callie, Golden Retriever, Finds More Money

Saturday, July 19th, 2008
Callie, Golden Retriever, retrieving My Golden Retriever, Callie, is slowly getting rich -- on money she finds on her morning doggie jog. I wrote, on March 24, that Callie found a five dollar bill. Well, she's moving in the right direction; this time she found ten bucks! Callie is making some progress with the "leave it" command. "Leave it" is a really good command, because, if you're fast enough, you can tell your dog to "leave it" before it picks something up, like a piece of trash along the road. Callie's morning jog is about three miles long on a pleasant road near a golf club. It's not like the road is littered with trash, but there are occasional tid-bits that are very attractive to a doggie -- especially Callie, it seems. Sometimes, a doggie's mouth is faster than a person's eye! Once in a while, Callie stabs at a candy wrapper, or a grass divot, before we can say "leave it" or pull her away from the offending article. When Callie's mouth beats us to the punch, the next command is "give!" Yesterday, Callie beat Barbara to the punch. Barbara knew Callie had grabbed something, but she didn't know what it was. So, bravely, she pried open Callie's very strong Golden Retriever mouth, reached way into it, and pulled out a ten dollar bill. I guess, if dogs can be trained to sniff out drugs and people, it should be possible to train them to sniff out money. Right? So how do we train Callie to go after the really big stuff, like one-hundred dollar bills? Is a Golden Retriever supposed to retrieve gold?

My Dog Found Five Bucks!

Monday, March 24th, 2008
Callie, now a fourteen-month-old Golden Retriever, but still a puppy in many ways, works very hard at the "leave it" command. This command is not just intended to get her to "let go" of something. If you're quick enough on the draw, you can use the "leave it" command to keep her from picking something up in the first place. I'm really more interested in building my dog relationship with Callie than in beating commands into her, but "leave it" is important. It can be a lifesaver. On our morning jog, a Golden Retriever has many temptations. There are some good things to be retrieved -- like sticks and pine cones. But there are also some things better not retrieved -- mostly stuff that occasionally flies out of a car window. Like a candy wrapper, a sales slip, or a packing peanut. Since some of Callie's jogging is on a golf course, she's also tempted frequently by a grass divot -- a hunk of grass and dirt that got gouged out of the golf course by a swinging golf club. She's pretty good at "leave it," if we see an offending piece of trash and yell "leave it" before Callie gets to it. But, much as we try to avoid this stuff, Callie still gets the jump on us sometimes. Occasionally, she sees some scrumptious looking piece of garbage before we do, and she's learned to make a quick stab before we can react. So, we've also gotten pretty good at prying her mouth open and reaching way down into her throat to eliminate the hazard. On Friday, she totally beat us to the "trash" with a lightning fast stab before anyone could utter the words "leave it!" But imagine our surprise when we reached down to the bottom of her throat and pulled out a nice, crisp five dollar bill! Who would have guessed? How would you train a dog to only retrieve paper currency? Are there any one-hundred-percent indestructible dog toys that we can buy for five bucks? BTW, "My Doggie Says... Messages from Jamie, the dog book I wrote about Callie's predecessor, Jamie, just won its fourth award -- a Silver Medal for non-fiction (Adult Books) in the Mom's Choice Awards. There's a nice review on their web site.

Decisions, Decisions, Puppy Decisions (by Callie)

Wednesday, March 19th, 2008
img_0569-2.jpg You know, I don't usually have to make a lot of decisions. Barbara and Fred decide a lot of stuff for me. Like when I get to eat, when we go jogging, what time we go to bed, and stuff like that. Sometimes, I do decide to take a nap. And sometimes it's hard to figure out which toy to play with, because I do have a lot of toys. So yesterday I'm walking down the hallway and Okie-Dokie the black cat goes walking by. That cat can be really arrogant. It walks with a swagger, and I swear it's always telling me, "ha, ha, I never have to be in a crate!" Or "cats are better than dogs." Actually, Okie-Dokie and I have become pretty good friends. We like to rub noses, and sometimes I lick Okie-Dokie's head. She seems to like that. But I really like to pester her sometimes, so it only took me a millisecond to decide to run down the hallway and pounce on Okie-Dokie -- just to see how loud she would "hiss!" But just as I started after Okie-Dokie, Barbara showed up at the other end of the hall in her jogging clothes and wearing her jogging fanny-pack. Uh-oh! Slam on the brakes! Given a choice between annoying Okie-Dokie and going jogging, I'll always go for the jog. It's much better exercise than pouncing on cats. Besides, I can go cat-pouncing just about any time I want. So I stopped myself in mid-pounce and ran over to Barbara so she could put my leash on. It wasn't a real hard decision to make, because I really like to go jogging, but it made me realize that my life is pretty simple most of the time. Eat, sleep, pounce on cats, pee, pooh, and eat some more. But you know what I really look forward to? The times when Fred and Barbara play with me and make me feel part of the family. Lots of times, I start the play by presenting them with one of my favorite toys. Then we play a game of "let's both hold this for a while." It's my favorite game, next to playing soccer with Fred. I'm getting to spend lots more time out of my crate, so I do have to make more decisions than before. But mostly it's deciding NOT to eat the rugs. Things seem to work better that way. Next time!

This Dog (Puppy) Finally Gets To Sleep In His Owner's Bed (By Callie)

Saturday, March 1st, 2008
img_0854-3.jpg Hi, Callie here again. I'm so excited that I'm getting to sleep with Fred & Barbara. Wow! What a treat! In case you're wondering, a December 4, 2007 Harris Poll showed that 69% of dog owners let their dog sleep in their bed. So I've just been dying to join the majority of my doggie friends, even though I'm still a puppy. I'm just a little over a year old now, and I've been sleeping in my crate ever since I moved into Fred's house about a year ago. One of my favorite photographs from "My Doggie Says... Messages from Jamie" is this picture of Jamie sleeping on Fred's bed. I've always looked forward to the day when I could do that. ch16_0011-2.jpg I've been working really hard on being a good dog, because I knew I would have to earn the right to sleep on Fred's bed. So I wasn't too surprised the other day when I saw Barbara picking up all the pillows and putting them outside the bedroom (I guess so I wouldn't eat them). I started to wonder, "Is this the night I get to sleep with Fred and Barbara?" She also closed the bathroom door, probably so I couldn't get in there and eat the toilet paper again. Boy, was I thrilled when Fred opened my crate door and I jumped up on the bed. I was so excited I ran around (on the bed) in small circles and kept giving Fred and Barbara great big schloppy licks all over their faces. Which was really fun for me. But after a few minutes, Fred and Barbara started pushing me away. They didn't push me off the bed, just toward one corner. About the sixth time Fred hid under the covers to avoid my schloppy licks, I started to get the idea that I was supposed to calm down. So I moved toward the empty corner and got comfortable. I went to sleep for about an hour and a half and then I woke up again and started with the schloppy kisses again. This was probably a real bad idea. After a few minutes of Fred pushing me toward my corner, I heard him say, "I'm not sure this is working." That really scared me, so I went back to my corner. After all, no one ever told me how to play this game. What were the rules? I was having to figure it out along the way. But I think I finally got there. So it turned out to be a great night. I got a good night's sleep (more or less; I was pretty excited). Fred and Barbara got a good night's sleep (I think). And, best of all, I've gotten to sleep with them the last few nights, and I know I'm a little better about snuggling into my corner. Until next time, Callie